Social Security Works

Retirement Security for All

3 notes

Medicare Voucher Plan Remains Unpopular | Pew Research Center

sarahlee310:

The survey, conducted August 16-19, 2012 among 1,005 adults nationwide, finds 72% have heard a lot or a little about a proposal to change Medicare into a program that would give future participants a credit toward purchasing private health insurance coverage. And among those who are aware, the idea remains unpopular; by a 49% to 34% margin more oppose than favor the idea. This is virtually unchanged from public reactions a little over a year ago, when Republicans in the House voted in favor of this proposal as part of the “Ryan plan.”

The survey, conducted August 16-19, 2012 among 1,005 adults nationwide, finds 72% have heard a lot or a little about a proposal to change Medicare into a program that would give future participants a credit toward purchasing private health insurance coverage. And among those who are aware, the idea remains unpopular; by a 49% to 34% margin more oppose than favor the idea. This is virtually unchanged from public reactions a little over a year ago, when Republicans in the House voted in favor of this proposal as part of the “Ryan plan.”

Good numbers showing that people oppose the idea of getting a check that doesn’t actually keep up with the costs of medical care. 

Filed under Medicare Voucher Romney Ryan

483 notes

ourpresidents:

On August 14, 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act.
Later that day, the Washington Post proclaimed that the Social Security Act was the “New Deal’s Most Important Act…Its importance cannot be exaggerated …because this legislation eventually will affect the lives of every man, woman, and child in the country.”
This poster was distributed from November 1936- July 1937 during the initial issuance of Social Security numbers through U.S. post offices and with the help of labor unions.
More - Posters from the Social Security Archives

Great poster! 

ourpresidents:

On August 14, 1935, President Franklin D. Roosevelt signed the Social Security Act.

Later that day, the Washington Post proclaimed that the Social Security Act was the “New Deal’s Most Important Act…Its importance cannot be exaggerated …because this legislation eventually will affect the lives of every man, woman, and child in the country.”

This poster was distributed from November 1936- July 1937 during the initial issuance of Social Security numbers through U.S. post offices and with the help of labor unions.

More - Posters from the Social Security Archives

Great poster! 

4 notes

ncpssm:

A coalition of Wisconsin activists, including NCPSSM Rally Corps members, attended an event to protest the privatizing of Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.

ncpssm:

A coalition of Wisconsin activists, including NCPSSM Rally Corps members, attended an event to protest the privatizing of Social Security, Medicare, and Medicaid.

25 notes

Dems slam Ryan over Social Security privatization - Yahoo! News

justinspoliticalcorner:

WASHINGTON (AP) — Democrats are eagerly renewing their fight against privatizing Social Security now that Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney has picked Paul Ryan as his running mate. It was a fight that didn’t go well for the GOP when President George W. Bush pushed the idea in 2005.

In his 2010 “Road Map for America’s Future,” the Wisconsin congressman proposed a plan to allow younger workers to divert more than one-third of their Social Security taxes into personal accounts that they would own and could will to their heirs.

Ryan wrote that the accounts would provide workers an opportunity “to build a significant nest egg for retirement that far exceeds what the current program can provide.” Workers 55 and older would stay in the current system.

Romney hasn’t embraced the proposal and Ryan, chairman of the House Budget Committee, didn’t include it in either of the federal budgets passed by House Republicans the past two years. But now that Ryan is running for vice president, Democrats hope to capitalize on the issue.

Bush’s proposal for private accounts received a chilly reception from members in both parties in Congress, though Ryan embraced it. Democrats used the issue against GOP congressional candidates in the 2006 election, when they regained control of the House and Senate.

“The very last thing we ought to be doing is putting at risk the retirement security of millions of America’s seniors,” said Rep. Debbie Wasserman Schultz of Florida, who heads the Democratic National Committee.

Until now, Social Security had been largely absent from the presidential campaign. President Barack Obama has yet to lay out a detailed plan for addressing the issue, and his silence is drawing criticism from advocates who supported him in the past. Romney has been more forthcoming with proposals, but Social Security has not been a big part of his campaign, either.

Romney, in his book, “No Apology,” said he liked the idea of personal accounts. But, he wrote, “Given the volatility of investment values that we have just experienced, I would prefer that individual accounts were added to Social Security, not diverted from it, and that they were voluntary.”

Romney’s current plan for Social Security doesn’t mention personal accounts. Instead, he proposes a gradual increase in the retirement age to account for growing life expectancy. For future generations, Romney would slow the growth of benefits “for those with higher incomes.”

Mitt Romney and Paul support gradual reforms to Social Security that protect current beneficiaries from any benefit disruptions while strengthening the program to ensure that it doesn’t go bankrupt,” Romney campaign spokesman Ryan Williams said.

The trustees who oversee Social Security say the trust funds that support the program will run dry in 2033. At that point, Social Security will generate only enough tax revenue to pay about 75 percent of benefits, triggering automatic cuts unless Congress acts.

During the 2008 campaign, Obama said he wanted to improve Social Security’s finances by applying the payroll tax to annual wages above $250,000. It is now limited to wages below $110,100, a level that increases with inflation.

Obama also pledged to oppose raising the retirement age or reducing annual cost-of-living adjustments, or COLAs. “Let me be clear, I will not do either,” Obama said at the time.

Last year, however, Obama put on the table a proposal to reduce annual COLAs during deficit-reduction talks with House Speaker John Boehner, R-Ohio. The talks ultimately failed and nothing came of the proposal, but it raised questions about whether Obama would honor his 2008 pledge.

h/t: Yahoo! News

A nice reminder that both Romney AND Ryan supported privatizing Social Security in the not-so-distant past. 

Filed under privatization social security